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Policy-relevant behaviours predict heavier drinking and mediate the relationship with age, gender and education status : analysis from the international alcohol control study

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dc.contributor.author Casswell, Sally
dc.contributor.author Huckle, Taisia
dc.contributor.author Wall, Martin
dc.contributor.author Parker, Karl
dc.contributor.author Chaiyasong, Surasak
dc.contributor.author Parry, Charles D. H.
dc.contributor.author Cuong, Pham Viet
dc.contributor.author Gray-Phillip, Gaile
dc.contributor.author Piazza, Marina
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-05T09:54:12Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-05T09:54:12Z
dc.date.issued 2018-01-04
dc.identifier.citation S. Casswell et al (2018). Policy-relevant behaviours predict heavier drinking and mediate the relationship with age, gender and education status : analysis from the international alcohol control study [Drug Alcohol Rev 2018;37:S86–S95] en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10625/57659
dc.description.abstract To investigate behaviours related to four alcohol policy variables (policy-relevant behaviours) and demographic variables in relation to typical quantities of alcohol consumed on-premise in six International Alcohol Control study countries. Design and methods: General population surveys with drinkers using a comparable survey instrument and data analysed using path analysis in an overall model and for each country. Measures: typical quantities per occasion consumed on-premise; gender, age; years of education, prices paid, time of purchase, time to access alcohol and liking for alcohol advertisements. Results: In the overall model younger people, males and those with fewer years of education consumed larger typical quantities. Overall lower prices paid, later time of purchase and liking for alcohol ads predicted consuming larger typical quantities; this was found in the high-income countries, less consistently in the high-middle-income countries and not in the low middle-income country. Three policy-relevant behaviours (prices paid, time of purchase, liking for alcohol ads) mediated the relationships between age, gender, education and consumption in high-income countries. Discussion and conclusions: International Alcohol Control survey data showed a relationship between policy-relevant behaviours and typical quantities consumed and support the likely effect of policy change (trading hours, price and restrictions on marketing) on heavier drinking. The path analysis also revealed policy-relevant behaviours were significant mediating variables between the effect of age, gender and educational status on consumption. However, this relationship is clearest in high-income countries. Further research is required to understand better how circumstances in low-middle-income countries impact effects of policies en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Drug and Alcohol Review (August 2018), 37 (Suppl. 2), S86–S95 en
dc.title Policy-relevant behaviours predict heavier drinking and mediate the relationship with age, gender and education status : analysis from the international alcohol control study en
dc.title.alternative Paper 9 - drug and alcohol review en
dc.type Journal Article (peer-reviewed) en
idrc.project.number 107205
idrc.project.componentnumber 107205002
idrc.project.title Evaluating Alcohol Control Policies in Peru and St. Kitts and Nevis en
idrc.copyright.holder © 2018 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review
idrc.copyright.oapermissionsource CC BY-NC 4.0 en
idrc.dspace.access Open Access en
idrc.rims.adhocgroup IDRC SUPPORTED en
idrc.recordsserver.bcsnumber IC36-1643402171-232527


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