Environmental stress and grain yields in China

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dc.contributor.author Jikun Huang
dc.contributor.author Rozelle, Scott
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-24T12:50:02Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-24T12:50:02Z
dc.date.issued 1993-07
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10625/54425
dc.identifier.uri http://krishikosh.egranth.ac.in/bitstream/1/2055593/1/MPKV-2055.pdf
dc.description Also published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, v. 77, no. 4, November 1995 en
dc.description.abstract After 1984 China's grain production began to stagnate, slowing during a time of continuing expansion of chemical inputs, irrigated area, and high-yielding rice, wheat, and maize varieties. In this paper we explore the hypothesis that the accumulation of environmental pressures, including erosion, salinization. Soil exhaustion, and degradation of the local environment, may be partially responsible for the recent slowdown of grain yields. Using provincial production data from 1975 [Q 1990. the analysis shows that environmental factors. especially the breakdown of the environment. did contribute to the -decline in the rate of increase of yields in China during the late t 980s. Erosion and 'salinization had a small, negative effect on yields. en
dc.format Text en
dc.format.extent 1 digital file (32 p. : ill.) en
dc.format.mimetype Application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.subject ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION en
dc.subject AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY en
dc.subject SOIL DEGRADATION en
dc.subject AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS en
dc.subject ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS en
dc.subject ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS en
dc.subject CROP LOSSES en
dc.title Environmental stress and grain yields in China en
dc.type IDRC Final Report en
idrc.project.number 910130
idrc.project.title Rice Economy (China) en
idrc.dspace.access IDRC Only en
idrc.rims.adhocgroup IDRC SUPPORTED en
idrc.recordsserver.bcsnumber RC000-1-48633


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