ANC and South Africa's Negotiated Transition to Democracy and Peace

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dc.contributor.author Maharaj, Mac
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-27T16:28:20Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-27T16:28:20Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.isbn 978-3-927783-88-1
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10625/44293
dc.description.abstract Political violence is a tool of both state and non-state actors, and replacing it by political methods of conflict management is essential to making sustainable peace. The aim of the study is the relationship between political and military strategies and tactics: to learn how resistance movements (often simplistically bundled under the label of non-state armed groups) contribute to the transformation of conflict and to peacemaking. In the South African context, and more particularly in the case of the African National Congress (ANC), its allies, and Umkhonto WeSizwe (MK), there was always a political purpose guiding the turn to armed struggle. en
dc.format Text en
dc.format.extent 1 digital file (38 p.) en
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Berghof Research Center for Constructive Conflict Management, Berlin, DE en
dc.relation.ispartof Berghof Transitions Series No. 2 en
dc.subject NATIONAL LIBERATION MOVEMENTS en
dc.subject POLITICAL ASPECTS en
dc.subject APARTHEID en
dc.subject VIOLENCE en
dc.subject POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT en
dc.subject PEACE RESEARCH en
dc.subject SOUTH AFRICA en
dc.subject CONFLICT RESOLUTION es
dc.title ANC and South Africa's Negotiated Transition to Democracy and Peace en
dc.type Case Study en
idrc.project.number 103613
idrc.project.title From War to Politics : Non State Armed Groups in Transition en
idrc.dspace.access IDRC Only en
idrc.rims.adhocgroup IDRC SUPPORTED en


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